The ABC of Photography – Joiner

A term coined by the artist David Hockney (born 1937) to describe his photo-collage work in the 1980s. Hockney’s joiners combined overlapping prints, made at slightly different times and from multiple viewpoints, to make landscapes and portraits. His most elaborate joiners used hundreds of individual prints to make one collage. Other photographers creating joiners (also called ‘panographs’) have followed Hockney’s method of assembling prints or have combined digital images on the screen using photo-stitching software.


 

The ABC of Photography – Jack

A socket into which a plug is inserted to make a connection, also known as a ‘female’ connector. A jack on a camera is used for connecting an accessory such as headphones or a remote shutter release. A 3.5mm mini-jack is used for connecting an external stereo

mic or to connect to old TVs.

Sources:  Pixabay, NASA,Wikipedia, Susan Wingfield Lamar High School


 

The ABC of Photography – J

The ABC of Photography – J

J

Jack

A socket into which a plug is inserted to make a connection, also known as a ‘female’ connector. A jack on a camera is used for connecting an accessory such as headphones or a remote shutter release. A 3.5mm mini-jack is used for connecting an external stereo mic or to connect to old TVs.

Male/Female

 

Joiner

A term coined by the artist David Hockney (born 1937) to describe his photo-collage work in the 1980s. Hockney’s joiners combined overlapping prints, made at slightly different times and from multiple viewpoints, to make landscapes and portraits. His most elaborate joiners used hundreds of individual prints to make one collage. Other photographers creating joiners (also called ‘panographs’) have followed Hockney’s method of assembling prints, or have combined digital images on screen using photo-stitching software.

 

JPEG (Joint Photographic Experts Group)

A file format used for digital images. A variable amount of compression can be used to vary the amount of detail stored and the resulting file size. It’s the standard format used by digital cameras (although raw or TIFF formats may also be options)